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A Step by Step Tutorial for Realistic Looking HDR

If you have been photographing for more than a year or two, you will have heard about HDR (which stands for High Dynamic Range). We have probably seen them, the “overcooked”, over processed HDR images that float around the photo websites. For some photographers, the process seems to force them to overdo their images and […]

 

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How Using Strong ND Filters Can Create Awesome Results

As a landscape photographer you rely heavily on filters. The ones you should use most often is a graduated neutral density (GND) filter which help balance the intensity between the sky and foreground.  This is much like regular ND filters (which are used to reduce the amount of light hitting the camera’s sensor)  except it’s a […]

 

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How to use shutter speed in Photography

Learning how to use shutter speed effectively can create lively pictures and give motion to your subject without blurring your picture. Let’s define what it is and how it is measured, followed by some real world examples. Shutter speed refers to the length of time your camera’s shutter remains open to allow light to enter and hit […]

 

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Versatility – Your Guide to Shooting Great Travel Photography

Professional travel photographers realize that the key to their business is versatility: to be able to shoot all styles of photography, and to consistently capture great shots even under very trying conditions. To be a strong assignment photographer you must identify your weakness and then work on it. Instead of concentrating on what you shoot […]

 

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A Beginner’s Guide to Using Aperture Priority Mode

Aperture priority mode on your DSLR is one of the things that most photographers have to use at some time or other. But one of the most confounding things about getting your first DLSR is the myriad of decisions you have to make about what that actually means and if it’s the right mode to […]

 

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