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Moving From a Point-and-Shoot to a DSLR Camera: A Reality Check

Point-and-shoot – the name cannot be more specific and these cameras do exactly that: you just need to point the camera to the desired scene and shoot! Done! You can get a reasonably good picture ready to be downloaded and shown to friends without any concerns about focusing and metering. If there is not enough light, […]

 

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How Using Strong ND Filters Can Create Awesome Results

As a landscape photographer you rely heavily on filters. The ones you should use most often is a graduated neutral density (GND) filter which help balance the intensity between the sky and foreground.  This is much like regular ND filters (which are used to reduce the amount of light hitting the camera’s sensor)  except it’s a […]

 

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Versatility – Your Guide to Shooting Great Travel Photography

Professional travel photographers realize that the key to their business is versatility: to be able to shoot all styles of photography, and to consistently capture great shots even under very trying conditions. To be a strong assignment photographer you must identify your weakness and then work on it. Instead of concentrating on what you shoot […]

 

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5 Tips for Mobile Travel Photography

Mobile photography has come a long way in recent years, to the point that people can now capture and edit very high quality images on their phones. This is beneficial in many aspects of life and for many different types of photographers, but one of the best applications of high-quality mobile photography is, without a […]

 

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A travel photographer’s guide to gear

Having freshly returned from a five week stint overseas, here we share our experiences using photography gear on the road.  Here’s their list of must-haves to help you decide what to pack for your next trip. 1.       Tripod Whatever you do, no matter what sort of corners you think you’re going to cut, don’t forget […]

 

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